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The issue

Winter is coming and so is the serious problem of antibiotic resistance. The World Health Organization has recognised antibiotic resistance as one of the most “primary global health threats today”.

“A UK report has estimated that a continued rise in antibiotic resistance by 2050 would lead to 10 million people dying every year, with a financial cost to the world of up to US$100 trillion.” (amr-review.org)
The reality is that antibiotics are losing their power. You can help preserve the miracle of antibiotics by being part of the solution.

SAVE THE SCRIPT

#savethescript is a short film competition dedicated to raising awareness about antibiotic resistance. Together, Tropfest and NPS MedicineWise invite you to use your passion for creative storytelling to make a difference to our future by creating a 45 second short film to help preserve the miracle of antibiotics.

**Update: #savethescript film competition has now closed but you can view the finalists and winning entries on YouTube**

Click here to see the Top 15 entries.

Click here to see the Top 16-25 entries.

Special congratulations to our winners…

First place: The Pick Up by One Way Pictures
Second place: Fight Antibiotic Resistance by Stevie Watkins
Third place: 10 Million Deaths by Seek and Hide Productions
Special commendation: Pills of Wisdom by Jemma Cotter
NPS MedicineWise staff pick: Antibiotic Man by Andrew Quaile.

FILMMAKER BRIEF

Be creative: we want to see all kinds of films and there are no barriers on genre or style, from narrative live action to animation or documentary.
Be passionate: tell a story that gets to the heart of this global health threat.
Be informed: learn more about antibiotic resistance and see the Need to Know facts and key messages for inspiration.

PRIZES
$10,000 in prize money is up for grabs!

1st place $7,000
2nd place $2,000
3rd place $1,500
Special consideration $500

As well as receiving $7,000, the 1st place winner will also have their film promoted to a massive global audience via the Tropfest platforms.

HOW TO ENTER
Please refer to the terms and conditions of entry for full entry guidelines and requirements.

Make a short film up to 45 seconds in length (you may enter as many short films as you like).
You have every day in May to enter. Entries close 31/05/2015 at 5:00PM AEST.
To submit, upload your short film to one of your social media accounts. Valid social media platforms include Vimeo, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter Video and Instagram Video.
The account you upload to must be a public account (refer to terms and conditions) and you must tag @npsmedicinewise and hashtag #savethescript in the description.
Fill out the entry form below and agree to the terms and conditions. Remember to enter the URL where you have uploaded your short film or else we won’t be able to see it.

If you have any questions please contact NPS MedicineWise at media@nps.org.au

TROPFEST

“Creative storytellers have a unique opportunity to use their craft to raise awareness about this global health threat, and to further develop their storytelling skill. We at Tropfest know Australians to be incredible filmmakers and we’re excited about the unique challenge this competition presents. We’re looking forward to seeing what stories are shared.” Michael Laverty, Tropfest Managing Director.

Tropfest is Australia’s most prestigious short film festival and the largest festival of its kind in the world. Founded in 1993 by film director John Polson as a small screening for family and friends at Sydney’s Tropicana Café, the Festival now attracts a national event audience of around 150,000 people.

Tropfest has expanded internationally to include new competitions and festivals in North America, (New York), the Middle East, New Zealand and South East Asia.

#savethescript
Competition Registration

Competition Registration

NEED TO KNOW

Winter is coming and you need to know the cold facts about antibiotic resistance. The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important advances of modern medicine. Now, because of the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, some bacterial infections that were once easily cured with antibiotics are becoming harder to treat.

Australia is one of the biggest contributors to antibiotic resistance, but we are also becoming a global leader in making change. That change starts with you. You can help by taking the pledge to fight antibiotic resistance.

#panel, #flip, #panel1, #flip1, #panel2, #flip2, #panel3, #flip3, #panel4, #flip4, #panel5, #flip5, #panel6, #flip6, #panel7, #flip7, #panel8, #flip8, #panel9, #flip9, #panel10, #flip10, #panel11, #flip11, #panel12, #flip12, #panel13, #flip13, #panel14, #flip14, #panel15, #flip15, #panel16, #flip16, #panel17, #flip17, #panel18, #flip18, #panel19, #flip19, #panel20, #flip20 { margin:0 5px 5px 0; } #flip, #flip1, #flip2, #flip3, #flip4, #flip5, #flip6, #flip7, #flip8, #flip9, #flip10, #flip11, #flip12, #flip13, #flip14, #flip15, #flip16, #flip17, #flip18, #flip19, #flip20 { min-width:65px; cursor:pointer; } #panel, #panel1,#panel2, #panel3,#panel4, #panel5,#panel6, #panel7,#panel8, #panel9,#panel10, #panel11,#panel12, #panel13,#panel14, #panel15,#panel16, #panel17,#panel18,#panel19,#panel20 { padding: 30px; display: none; } .block{ clear:both; overflow:hidden; float:right; width:490px; margin-top:-280px; } .block div{ float:left; width:36px;} .social-sharing-box{float:right; margin-top:20px;} .social-sharing-box a{float:right; margin-right:5px;} .social-sharing-box a img{margin:0 !important;} .block img{ float:left; margin-right:30px; clear:left; } .content{ clear:both; overflow:visible; position:relative;} .content .left, .content .right{ float:left; width:45%; } .content .right{ float:right; width:45%; } .content .left{margin-right:20px;} .content a.close-btn{display:none; } .content .left img , .content .right img{float:left; margin:0 30px 30px 0;} a.readmore-btn{ text-decoration:underline;} Click to get the facts The development of antibiotics was one of the most important advances of medicine. But now, because of the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, bacterial infections that were once easily cured with antibiotics are becoming harder to treat. Australia is one of the biggest contributors to this problem – but we are also one of many global leaders trying to make a change. That change starts with you. You need to know the facts about antibiotic resistance, and we’re here to tell you. Every day in May we’ll be sharing important information that you need to know. Spread knowledge, not infections. It’s up to you and every Australian to save so they work when we need them to. Read more You could die from a single cut or scrape if infection set in. Now, with antibiotics in our lives, death by infection is only a very small percentage of what it was one hundred years ago. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? You could die from a single cut or scrape if infection set in. Now, with antibiotics in our lives, death by infection is only a very small percentage of what it was one hundred years ago. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? The ‘wonder drug’: the discovery of penicillin was so significant it was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945. In 1945, Alexander Fleming, Howard Florey and Ernst Chain were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for having contributed to discovering penicillin. Now, 70 years later the ‘precious resource’ of antibiotics is losing its power because of the common misuse of antibiotics. The ‘wonder drug’: the discovery of penicillin was so significant it was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1945. In 1945, Alexander Fleming, Howard Florey and Ernst Chain were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for having contributed to discovering penicillin. Now, 70 years later the ‘precious resource’ of antibiotics is losing its power because of the common misuse of antibiotics. 100 years ago, before the widespread use of antibiotics, there was no effective cure for common bacterial infections. Between 1922 and 1924, infectious and parasitic diseases caused 15% of all deaths in Australia. By 1966, they caused less than 1% of all deaths. This reduction is generally believed to be the result of medical advances including the availability of antibiotics from the 1940s. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? 100 years ago, before the widespread use of antibiotics, there was no effective cure for common bacterial infections. Between 1922 and 1924, infectious and parasitic diseases caused 15% of all deaths in Australia. By 1966, they caused less than 1% of all deaths. This reduction is generally believed to be the result of medical advances including the availability of antibiotics from the 1940s. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? Before antibiotics, doctors used to be powerless against serious bacterial infections. The only option for severe bacterial infections was to hope that a person’s own immune system would overpower the infection. But, for millions each year this never happened. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? Before antibiotics, doctors used to be powerless against serious bacterial infections. The only option for severe bacterial infections was to hope that a person’s own immune system would overpower the infection. But, for millions each year this never happened. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? The world before antibiotics Before the first antibiotics were prescribed in the 1940s, bacteria was a killer. A small cut could become fatal if it became infected, and routine surgery and childbirth were fraught with the risk of infection. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? The world before antibiotics Before the first antibiotics were prescribed in the 1940s, bacteria was a killer. A small cut could become fatal if it became infected, and routine surgery and childbirth were fraught with the risk of infection. What would happen now if we lost the miracle of antibiotics? Antibiotic resistance is not coming – it is here now. Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria mutate in response to antibiotic use. Antibiotic resistance is a global issue and affecting Australians today. You may have already heard of resistant strains, sometimes referred to as ‘superbugs’, like MRSA - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Multi-drug resistant E. coli in urinary tract infections is present in Australia. Failure of the last resort antibiotic treatment for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea has even occurred in Australia. In April 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) released the first global report on antibiotic resistance. The report confirmed high rates of antibiotic resistance in bacteria that cause common community and hospital infections (eg, pneumonia, urinary tract infections) around the world. Antibiotic resistance is not coming – it is here now. Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria mutate in response to antibiotic use. Antibiotic resistance is a global issue and affecting Australians today. You may have already heard of resistant strains, sometimes referred to as ‘superbugs’, like MRSA - Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Multi-drug resistant E. coli in urinary tract infections is present in Australia. Failure of the last resort antibiotic treatment for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhoea has even occurred in Australia. In April 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) released the first global report on antibiotic resistance. The report confirmed high rates of antibiotic resistance in bacteria that cause common community and hospital infections (eg, pneumonia, urinary tract infections) around the world. Antibiotics are a dying breed. Don’t be part of the problem: don’t ask for antibiotics when you don’t need them. 1 in 5 Australians expect antibiotics for viruses like a cold or flu, and 17% would ask a doctor to prescribe antibiotics, even though they won’t work on a viral infection. Antibiotics are a dying breed. Don’t be part of the problem: don’t ask for antibiotics when you don’t need them. 1 in 5 Australians expect antibiotics for viruses like a cold or flu, and 17% would ask a doctor to prescribe antibiotics, even though they won’t work on a viral infection. Australia has one of the higher rates of antibiotic use in the OECD. 24 million antibiotic prescriptions are written in Australia each year. Put in perspective, that’s enough for one prescription for every Australian. Australia has one of the higher rates of antibiotic use in the OECD. 24 million antibiotic prescriptions are written in Australia each year. Put in perspective, that’s enough for one prescription for every Australian. “They’ll just make new, stronger antibiotics…”: A common misconception is that when we run out of effective antibiotics for common infections, we’ll just develop more. In fact, new antibiotics are rare, and the once large number of pharmaceutical companies investing in antibiotic research has dwindled. The most recent discovery, teixobactin, still needs to undergo further studies and testing in humans, which will take many years, but even then it won’t be effective on all bacterial infections. “They’ll just make new, stronger antibiotics…”: A common misconception is that when we run out of effective antibiotics for common infections, we’ll just develop more. In fact, new antibiotics are rare, and the once large number of pharmaceutical companies investing in antibiotic research has dwindled. The most recent discovery, teixobactin, still needs to undergo further studies and testing in humans, which will take many years, but even then it won’t be effective on all bacterial infections. The World Health Organization has identified antibiotic resistance as “one of the greatest threats to human health today … no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country”. A 2013 report estimated that in the United States every year, two million people fall ill and 23,000 people die from antibiotic-resistant infections. The problem is growing. Preserve the miracle of antibiotics. The World Health Organization has identified antibiotic resistance as “one of the greatest threats to human health today … no longer a prediction for the future, it is happening right now in every region of the world and has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country”. A 2013 report estimated that in the United States every year, two million people fall ill and 23,000 people die from antibiotic-resistant infections.The problem is growing. Preserve the miracle of antibiotics. POST ANTIBIOTIC-ERA The World Health Organization is warning us that we may be heading towards a “post-antibiotic era” – in which common infections and minor injuries can kill. Can you imagine a world without antibiotics? According to the White House’s National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, “in a world with few effective antibiotics, modern medical advances such as surgery, transplants, and chemotherapy may no longer be viable due to the threat of infection.” POST ANTIBIOTIC-ERA The World Health Organization is warning us that we may be heading towards a “post-antibiotic era” – in which common infections and minor injuries can kill. Can you imagine a world without antibiotics? According to the White House’s National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, “in a world with few effective antibiotics, modern medical advances such as surgery, transplants, and chemotherapy may no longer be viable due to the threat of infection.” If you or a member of your family develop an antibiotic-resistant infection, you will have the infection for longer, you may be more likely to have complications from the infection, you could remain infectious for longer and pass your infection to other people. And some antibiotic resistant infections could in fact become untreatable. If you or a member of your family develop an antibiotic-resistant infection, you will have the infection for longer, you may be more likely to have complications from the infection, you could remain infectious for longer and pass your infection to other people. And some antibiotic resistant infections could in fact become untreatable. Superbug stowaways can hitch a ride with travellers Travellers can return to Australia infected with multi-drug-resistant organisms, particularly ones that cause tuberculosis, gonorrhoea or hospital-acquired infections. Patients with resistant bacteria faced extended hospital stays of 1 to 4 months. Such complications could become commonplace if antibiotic resistance continues its uncontrolled geographical spread. Superbug stowaways can hitch a ride with travellers Travellers can return to Australia infected with multi-drug-resistant organisms, particularly ones that cause tuberculosis, gonorrhoea or hospital-acquired infections. Patients with resistant bacteria faced extended hospital stays of 1 to 4 months. Such complications could become commonplace if antibiotic resistance continues its uncontrolled geographical spread. According to the White House’s National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic Resistance, “antibiotics are a precious resource” and “preserving its usefulness will require cooperation and collaboration.” Everyone has a part to play in the fight against antibiotic resistance. According to the White House’s National Strategy for Combating Antibiotic Resistance, “antibiotics are a precious resource” and “preserving its usefulness will require cooperation and collaboration.” Everyone has a part to play in the fight against antibiotic resistance. Where will you be in 2050? A UK report has estimated that a continued rise in antibiotic resistance by 2050 would lead to 10 million people dying every year with a financial cost to the world of up to US$100 trillion. We need to act now to stop the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Where will you be in 2050? A UK report has estimated that a continued rise in antibiotic resistance by 2050 would lead to 10 million people dying every year with a financial cost to the world of up to US$100 trillion. We need to act now to stop the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Think of your body as a human Petri dish If you have recently taken antibiotics, you can have antibiotic resistant bacteria develop then persist in your body for as long as twelve months. They can multiply and become strong enough to resist antibiotics in the future. These antibiotic-resistant bacteria can then be passed on to family members or other people in the community. Think of your body as a human Petri dish If you have recently taken antibiotics, you can have antibiotic resistant bacteria develop then persist in your body for as long as twelve months. They can multiply and become strong enough to resist antibiotics in the future. These antibiotic-resistant bacteria can then be passed on to family members or other people in the community. Antibiotics do not work for all infections. They don’t treat viral colds and flu; and most coughs, earaches, sinus congestion and sore throats will get better without antibiotics. If you are usually healthy and well, your immune system will take care of most respiratory tract infections— including viral and some bacterial infections — by itself. Be part of the solution: don’t demand antibiotics; tell your doctor that you only want antibiotics if they are truly necessary. Antibiotics do not work for all infections. They don’t treat viral colds and flu; and most coughs, earaches, sinus congestion and sore throats will get better without antibiotics. If you are usually healthy and well, your immune system will take care of most respiratory tract infections— including viral and some bacterial infections — by itself. Be part of the solution: don’t demand antibiotics; tell your doctor that you only want antibiotics if they are truly necessary. Coloured mucous or ‘snot’ isn’t always a sign of a bacterial infection. Green or yellow coloured snot can in fact be a sign that your immune system is fighting your infection, and not that your illness is getting worse. That also goes for other symptoms including cough, sore throat, earaches and fever. While some people with these symptoms will need antibiotics, most people won’t and will get better without antibiotics. Of course, if your symptoms continue to get worse, see your doctor.   Coloured mucous or ‘snot’ isn’t always a sign of a bacterial infection. Green or yellow coloured snot can in fact be a sign that your immune system is fighting your infection, and not that your illness is getting worse. That also goes for other symptoms including cough, sore throat, earaches and fever. While some people with these symptoms will need antibiotics, most people won’t and will get better without antibiotics. Of course, if your symptoms continue to get worse, see your doctor. Be part of the solution: simple steps to avoid infections. It’s easy to take simple steps to avoid infections and to stop them from spreading. You can do this by washing your hands, coughing and sneezing into a tissue and throwing it away, and staying home when you are sick. Staying home when you are sick will help you get over the infection faster, and it will also mean that you won’t spread your infection. Having a flu vaccination every year before winter can help to protect you from getting the flu.   Be part of the solution: simple steps to avoid infections. It’s easy to take simple steps to avoid infections and to stop them from spreading. You can do this by washing your hands, coughing and sneezing into a tissue and throwing it away, and staying home when you are sick. Staying home when you are sick will help you get over the infection faster, and it will also mean that you won’t spread your infection. Having a flu vaccination every year before winter can help to protect you from getting the flu. We know what needs to be done to solve the crisis… we’re just not doing it. Think before you ask. Antibiotics WILL NOT: • help a cold or flu get better faster • stop a cold or flu from getting worse • stop a cold or flu from spreading to other people.   We know what needs to be done to solve the crisis… we’re just not doing it. Think before you ask. Antibiotics WILL NOT: • help a cold or flu get better faster • stop a cold or flu from getting worse • stop a cold or flu from spreading to other people. The development of antibiotics was one of the most important advances of medicine. But now, because of the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, bacterial infections that were once easily cured with antibiotics are becoming harder to treat. Australia is one of the biggest contributors to this problem – but we are also one of many global leaders trying to make a change. That change starts with you. You need to know the facts about antibiotic resistance, and we’re here to tell you. Every day in May we’ll be sharing important information that you need to know. Spread knowledge, not infections. It’s up to you and every Australian to save so they work when we need them to.  

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Help us start the conversation. Join the fight against antibiotic resistance by: sharing our Need to Know facts, taking the pledge and by entering the Save the Script short film competition.

Join tens of thousands of Australians who have joined the fight against antibiotic resistance by taking the pledge.

The Pledge

Join the fight against
antibiotic resistance
According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to human health today You can make a difference by taking our pledge.

I will not ask for antibiotics for colds and the flu as they have no effect on viruses
I understand that antibiotics will not help me recover faster from a viral infection
I will only take antibiotics in the way they have been prescribed
I understand that it is possible to pass on antibiotic resistant bacteria to others
I will make a greater effort to prevent the spread of germs by practising good hygiene

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